Displaying items by tag: 2001
Monday, 25 April 2011 23:47

Professor Oscar Ravera

Professor Oscar Ravera

Professor Oscar Ravera is a pioneer in the field of freshwater ecology in Italy. Over a three-decade period, he has made significant contributions to intellectual, scientific and theoretical approaches to environmental concerns. He has published more than 200 scientific papers (in Italian, English and French) on lakes, water research, ecology, pollution and on other environmental issues. Topics covered include the anthropogenic nutrient overload of waters causing eutrophication, the effects of ionizing radiation and nuclear fall-out on aquatic environments, general questions about the meaning and role of ecology in environmental sciences, as well as questions regarding environmental ethics.

In addition to his internationally acclaimed research activities, Ravera has had considerable involvement as advisor to the Commission of the European Communities (CEC), in formulating environmental research programmes to be undertaken at its Joint Research Center in Ispra, Italy. His voice has made a significant impact throughout the European Community. In non-CEC programmes, he acted as supervisor of the 'Alpine Programme', which was part of the 18 country OECD International Programme on eutrophication.

He is a member of the bilateral Commission between Italy and Switzerland regarding the protection of Alpine lakes, scientific coordinator of UNESCO's International Expert Group on the lagoons of Venice, and he has been associated with several other national and international projects. As teacher and advisor to students and study groups, his invaluable guidance is not limited to Italy, but involves students in universities in France, Germany and Holland.

Professor Ravera is co-founder, president and secretary of the Italian Society of Ecology (SITE), and in collaboration with Professor Moroni of Parma, he has put the environment on a firm footing in the academic community of Italy. SITE has grown into one of the most active and influential ecological societies in the world, and today, thanks to SITE, all Italian universities have a chair of ecology.


Sydney Olympic Organizing Committee for the Olympic Games and the Olympic Coordinating Authority

Sydney's successful bid to host the 2000 Olympic Games had as one of its principal themes, a commitment to ecologically sustainable development. Two organizations were created to prepare for this international event: the Olympic Coordination Authority (OCA) and the Sydney Organizing Committee for the Olympic Games (SOCOG).

OCA, a statutory authority of the New South Wales (NSW) government, was responsible for the physical preparation and coordination of government-wide activity related to the Olympics. SOCOG, a corporation also set up by the NSW government, was responsible for planning and staging the various Olympics events. OCA and SOCOG worked with all partners, both public and private, to ensure that the environmental commitments were met.

The Sydney Games set new environmental benchmarks in the areas of energy, water conservation, waste minimization, pollution avoidance and the protection of the natural environment. SOCOG and OCA developed an environmental policy and established an environmental programme and integrated environmental considerations into all their administration, planning and operational activities.

SOCOG and OCA showed strong leadership by setting out a compelling vision, using the competitive tendering process to elicit environmentally-progressive submissions and by putting in place effective environmental management tools. The same approach was taken for environmental protection, infrastructure development and venue/facility construction.

SOCOG and OCA developed innovative mechanisms allowing open communication between government agencies, environment and community groups, sponsors and Olympic organizers; set up a community project, which resulted in the planting of some four million trees around Australia; set up a major project to assess the greenhouse impact of the Games; installed solar energy at the Olympic site; protected the Green and Golden Bell Frog; and created the first car-free Games for spectators.

Volunteers piloted a composting scheme, whereby 400,000 worms turned SOCOG's canteen waste into one ton of solid fertilizer and 1,000 litres of liquid fertilizer. Visitors ate from plates made of sugar starch, used knives and forks made from cornstarch and disposed of the leftovers in compost bins.

The new suburb built for the Olympic athletes was designed according to the best environmental principles. Electricity was generated by solar cells and water was recycled to feed the garden and flush the toilets.

The Sydney Olympic Games also increased awareness about environmental issues, including the link between sport and environment.


Monday, 25 April 2011 23:37

Triciclo

Triciclo

The Triciclo Centre, run by 22 members and numerous volunteers, some of whom are disabled, was established in 1996 to promote the reuse of discarded materials, such as clothes, furniture, books, toys and domestic tools, in a creative and innovative way. It also provides information on the various issues dealing with waste and their alternative uses.

Triciclo also obtains and disseminates information about the experience of other countries in Europe and Africa in this area. Since it began its activities of selling objects that people throw away, Tricicolo has cooperated with schools to sensitize students about environmental problems and on the composition of materials that are used in every day life. Triciclo stimulates their interest by showing them how they can be reused and suggests alternative uses for them. Triciclo clears public places and private houses of old things and selects and sells materials to recycling centers and to handicraft laboratories, which repair second-hand items.

A permanent exhibit on waste recycling, on works of art made of recycled materials and on research done in this field has been put up by Triciclo in two municipalities in Torino.


Monday, 25 April 2011 23:34

Arunee Dejdamrongsakkul

Arunee Dejdamrongsakkul

Arunee Dejdamrongsakkul is a secondary school student at Suksanari School in Bangkok, Thailand, who has worked on environment and energy issues for several years, an interest, which was spurred by an event organized by the National Energy Policy Office in 1997. She had to research the issues for an exhibition at her school, and then had the opportunity to become a member of a group of 900 upper secondary school students working on energy efficiency issues, which is called "Divide by Two".

Arunee has participated in nine energy campaigns in this group, and has since set up a group of 160 students called The Earth Club in her school to work on energy efficiency issues. She is the president of this group whose activities include participating in National Energy Policy Office competitions. The group has won funding from these competitions to run more activities in the school. The Earth Club has run an environment and energy radio programme twice a week since February 1999, and in December of that same year, a magazine was launched to which Arunee contributes a regular column - approximately 3,000 students read this magazine. The group also participated in events to promote a National Car Free Day on 22 September 2000 in Thailand.

Arunee has also been involved in projects in 20 neighboring schools, often acting as a resource person to help other students understand the issues. Through her personal commitment and enthusiasm, she has been a role model, and students at her school and other schools have become more knowledgeable about the environment, and energy issues in particular, through practical projects and team working. Arunee has made a valuable contribution to the promotion of environmental issues in Thailand.


Monday, 25 April 2011 23:26

Jose Marti Pioneer Organization

Jose Marti Pioneer Organization

The Jose Marti Pioneer Organization, established in 1961, is a volunteer organization through which more than one and a half million young Cubans undertake environmental protection activities. Some of its 278 activities include: avoiding fires in forests and meadowlands through environmental education in schools; ensuring that bonfires are extinguished correctly; participation in the creation of medicinal and fruit tree nurseries to create new forests; organization of World Environment Day (WED) activities; sending environmental protection messages through the mass media; preparation of audio-visual materials on the environment for all Cuban schools; production of the weekly "Be up-to-date" news programme; and the design of an educational programme on conservation for schools.

In 1992, the Pioneers initiated a movement whereby a number of activities are undertaken including the clean up of schools, parks, monuments, forests, rivers and seas, as well as recycling efforts. Every year on WED, half a million Pioneers participate in a national campaign to promote environmental protection. Pioneers have developed painting, song and writing contests on the environment in schools, and for one month every year, Pioneers in Secondary Schools participate in agricultural activities, such as the cultivation of crops and the cleaning of fields. Secondary School Pioneers also participate in various environmental clubs with different themes, such as Friends of Nature (9,421 members), The Animals and Me (7,396 members) and The Lungs of My City (5,683 members).

The Pioneers have created didactic games, which offer solutions to environmental problems and help enhance the environmental vocabulary of eight year-olds. The organization also produces a number of publications on environmental conservation.


Khohlooa, Matholoana and Lesotho Herdboys

The Khohlooa, Matholoana and Likobo Herdboys are groups of herders in village communities in Thupa-Kubu, Berea District in Lesotho. Though a disadvantaged group of Basotho society, they are the day-to-day managers of the environment.

Their involvement in natural resource management has come about as a result of their concern over the limited supply of forage in grazing areas in their villages, which has resulted in poor livestock yields. The herders have carried out simple soil and water conservation measures, such as the building of silt traps and the planting of Kikuyu grass to reclaim dongas. They also keep bees for honey-producing purposes in their respective areas.

While herding, they have prepared 7,000 holes to plant trees for fuelwood and shade, and, to date, they have managed to plant 1,300 seedlings. They have also built a dam to collect water for their animals and to irrigate fodder and vegetables. In 1998, they motivated herders from 21 villages to undertake soil and water conservation activities.

Thanks to the efforts of the Herdboys, there is less trespassing on pasture-land, fewer quarrels over communal grazing areas, and the burning of village grazing spaces has been reduced.


Monday, 25 April 2011 22:58

Jean-Dominic Levesque-Rene

Jean-Dominic Levesque-Rene

During the course of his life, Jean-Dominic Levesque-Rene has seen his share of battles, first with his own cancer and then on another front, as a one-kid environmental crusade. At the age of 10, Jean-Dominic began his fight to ban the use of pesticides, at the same time he started chemotherapy treatment for a cancer of the immune system. He was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a cancer he believes was caused as a result of early childhood exposure to pesticides.

He grew up in Ile Bizard, where golf courses make up about half of the town's landmass. Keeping the fairways immaculate requires the use of a huge quantity of pesticides. He organized a group of children and picketed City Hall demanding a ban on pesticides. He has worked tirelessly by lobbying various levels of government through petitions (he received 4,000 letters and gathered 15,000 signatures), letter writing, briefings, speeches and conferences.

His actions have generated tremendous awareness about environmental and human health hazards of pesticide use, especially its affects on children's health. His efforts have resulted in many municipalities across Canada enacting by-laws to ban pesticides. In May 2000, the Federal House of Commons Standing Committee on the Environment and Sustainable Development recommended a ban on pesticides for cosmetic purposes.

Jean-Dominic has made presentations before national and international fora on public health and environmental protection. In May 2000, he spoke before a panel of delegates from Canada, the United States of America and Mexico at a conference organized by the Commission for Environmental Cooperation, under the auspices of NAFTA. His recommendations on children's health and the environment were accepted by the Committee. He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the prestigious Terry Fox award for environmental activism (1995), the Canadian Order of Youth, the country's highest honour (1995), the Federal Department of the Environment Canadian Health Environment Award (1996), and the Quebec Provincial Government Phoenix Environmental Youth Awareness Prize (1998).


Monday, 25 April 2011 00:00

Yayasan Anak Warisan Alam - (YAWA)

Yayasan Anak Warisan Alam (YAWA)

Yayasan Anak Warisan Alam (YAWA), or Children's Environmental Heritage Foundation, is an organization committed to changing young people's attitudes towards the environment. Set up in 1990 as the Junior Environmental Group of Malaysia, it is now a registered foundation dedicated to instilling environmental awareness in young people through thought-provoking, fun-filled activities.

YAWA has formed a global link with environmental groups in Australia,  Sweden, Angola, India, the Philippines,South Africa, Japan, China, Thailand and Indonesia. Through an interactive web-site, called,www.myonlyplanet.org, YAWA has initiated a communications network called South-east Asian Environmental Network, (SEAYEN) for youths and environmental NGOs in this region.  The objective of this network is for young people to work seriously together on trans-boundary issues on air-pollution, sea pollution, forest fire, animal smuggling and illegal logging.  A training programme, called Eco-volunteer Training Certificate, EVTC, has been designed for young people. It hopes to instill a sense of deeper understanding of environmental degradation we are facing together and to take positive action. 

At local level, it has organized more than 150 activities, from  saving sea turtles, air-watch,  beach and lake clean up exercises, tree planting to helping children express their environmental concerns through art. YAWA organizes eco-camps for children in the village and children with special needs to help them better understand  the ecosystems. It has produced postcards to ‘Spread the Message to Share the Planet’.  Children’s messages and expressions can be viewed on, yawamalaysia.org YAWA is working with other NGO on a long term river-care project in Kuala Lumpur.

Abroad, YAWA has taken part in a number of UNEP international children’s conferences, Leave It to Us and TUNZA.  They participated in painting the longest mural in the UK in 2000.  In 1995, several members of the Foundation attended the first UNEP International Children's Conference on the Environment in Britain. Inspired by that meeting, YAWA organized its own international conferences, bringing together children form aroundMalaysia and the world to discuss important green issues.

The first conference, entitled ‘Sustain Today for Tomorrow’,  was held in 1996 at the Forestry Institute in Kuala Lumpur where delegates learned that it takes millions of years for a rainforest to develop its amazing biodiversity and just minutes to wipe it out. In 1998, the year Malaysia faced a water shortage crisis, the second conference was held in Marang, which taught delegates that water is not as limitless as it seems. In 2000, the 3rd conference, held in Ampang Pecah studied the problems of air-pollution. Its 4th conference was held in Melaka as it focused on protection and conservation of our ‘Heritage’.

YAWA 5th conference in December 2004, looks at the sea issues and how to ‘Save the Seas Around Us’, as its theme.

Tuesday, 22 March 2011 21:54

Jose Marti Pioneer Organization

Youth Award Winner in 2001

The Jose Marti Pioneer Organization, established in 1961, is a volunteer organization through which more than one and a half million young Cubans undertake environmental protection activities. Some of its 278 activities include: avoiding fires in forests and meadowlands through environmental education in schools; ensuring that bonfires are extinguished correctly; participation in the creation of medicinal and fruit tree nurseries to create new forests; organization of World Environment Day (WED) activities; sending environmental protection messages through the mass media; preparation of audio-visual materials on the environment for all Cuban schools; production of the weekly "Be up-to-date" news programme; and the design of an educational programme on conservation for schools.

In 1992, the Pioneers initiated a movement whereby a number of activities are undertaken including the clean up of schools, parks, monuments, forests, rivers and seas, as well as recycling efforts. Every year on WED, half a million Pioneers participate in a national campaign to promote environmental protection. Pioneers have developed painting, song and writing contests on the environment in schools, and for one month every year, Pioneers in Secondary Schools participate in agricultural activities, such as the cultivation of crops and the cleaning of fields. Secondary School Pioneers also participate in various environmental clubs with different themes, such as Friends of Nature (9,421 members), The Animals and Me (7,396 members) and The Lungs of My City (5,683 members).

The Pioneers have created didactic games, which offer solutions to environmental problems and help enhance the environmental vocabulary of eight year-olds. The organization also produces a number of publications on environmental conservation.
Tuesday, 22 March 2011 21:36

Khohlooa, Matholoana and Lesotho Herdboys

Youth Award Winner in 2001

The Khohlooa, Matholoana and Likobo Herdboys are groups of herders in village communities in Thupa-Kubu, Berea District in Lesotho. Though a disadvantaged group of Basotho society, they are the day-to-day managers of the environment.

Their involvement in natural resource management has come about as a result of their concern over the limited supply of forage in grazing areas in their villages, which has resulted in poor livestock yields. The herders have carried out simple soil and water conservation measures, such as the building of silt traps and the planting of Kikuyu grass to reclaim dongas. They also keep bees for honey-producing purposes in their respective areas.

While herding, they have prepared 7,000 holes to plant trees for fuelwood and shade, and, to date, they have managed to plant 1,300 seedlings. They have also built a dam to collect water for their animals and to irrigate fodder and vegetables. In 1998, they motivated herders from 21 villages to undertake soil and water conservation activities.

Thanks to the efforts of the Herdboys, there is less trespassing on pasture-land, fewer quarrels over communal grazing areas, and the burning of village grazing spaces has been reduced.
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