Displaying items by tag: 1994

Lillehammer Olympic Organizing Committee and Project for an Environment-Friendly Olympics

The Lillehammer Olympic Committee and the Project for an Environment-Friendly Olympics set an environmental standard, which was conspicuously absent in previous Olympics and which will undoubtedly set a precedent. The Project for an Environment-Friendly Olympics, comprising mainly NGOs, originally opposed the games in Lillehammer for environmental reasons, however, they decided to work with the Olympic Committee to ensure that most of the venues as well as transportation plans were designed to cause as little ecological damage as possible. Authorities used various economic instruments to ensure a green approach. For example, fines were levied for the number of trees felled. In addition, an ice rink was built inside a mountain so as o save energy for heating; battery-powered ice machines were used instead of propane gas-fuelled ones so as to keep the bobsled track cold; and the bobsled course was designed to blend in with the forest on the fringes of the mountains outside Lillehammer. Many of the structures in the Olympic village can be disassembled and rebuilt as housing in other parts of Norway. The plates, utensils and cups, used by food vendors, were also designed with the environment in mind, as they were made from a material which could be fed to livestock once they had been used. Hotels and other facilities were built so as to mix with the decor of the village and all vehicles were banned from Lillehammer during the games.

Thursday, 02 June 2011 13:48

Nikita Nikolaevich Moiseev

Nikita Nikolaevich Moiseev

Mr. N. N. Moiseev is a scientist in the field of environmental protection as well a education. Under his leadership the first mathematical pattern of biosphere was developed. He also developed the Nuclear Winter Hypothesis, which forced nuclear States to stop nuclear tests and the use of nuclear weapons in order to save the biosphere. He is a member of the Russian Academy of Sciences, whose spectrum of interests and activities brought him from computing military missile trajectories to mathematical modelling of the pernicious effects of a large scale nuclear war to his current involvement in environmental activities aimed at protecting future generations. He organized the Russian Section of the Green Cross International and became its first President. In 1992, he was one of the initiators of the establishment of the International Independent University of Ecology in Moscow, which promotes environmental awareness, and possibly, making it the first non-governmental humanitarian university in the world.

Thursday, 02 June 2011 13:43

Garth Owen-Smith and Margaret Jacobsohn

Garth Owen-Smith and Margaret Jacobsohn

 

In a remote corner of Kunene Province in North-Western Namibia, Garth Owen-Smith and Margaret Jacobsohn have been working quietly to link wildlife conservation with the needs of the local Himba, Herero and other peoples. Owen-Smith's and Jacobsohn's 20 years in the field have resulted in an auxiliary game guard system using local communities to manage and protect the wildlife. The system, in operation since 1982, is an example of conservation extension in practice. The approach has pioneered what is known as community-based conservation in Namibia. Their work has resulted in the protection of the last population of desert-adapted black rhino and elephant. Since Namibia's independence, a challenging new dimension has been added to their work. This is the development of a national community-based conservation programme by the newly formed Ministry of Wildlife, Conservation and Tourism, patterned after the field successes of their earlier work. The result is a national programme aimed at designing natural resource and land-use plans with local communities, not for them. This is now becoming a model for communities throughout Africa. For their 20 years in the field, Owen-Smith and Jacobsohn won the 1993 Goldman Prize awarded to grassroots environmentalists from the six inhabited continents.Garth Owen-Smith and Margaret Jacobsohn

Thursday, 02 June 2011 13:25

Gonzalo Palomino

Gonzalo Palomino

 

Mr. Gonzalo Palomino pioneered the environmental movement in Colombia.

The Ecological Group of the University of Tolima, which he coordinated, began 20 years ago, and since then he has encouraged, inspired, and trained many people who are now committed to protecting the environment.

The Network of Natural Reserves of the Civil Society of Colombia which currently represents 54 private natural reserves and around 15,000 hectares of forest dedicated to conservation, environmental education and sustainable development is a strong supporter of Mr. Palomino's activities.

 

Wednesday, 01 June 2011 20:17

Nicanor Perlas

Nicanor Perlas


Mr. Nicanor Perlas successfully solved problems of growing food without pesticides. His approach not only increased yields and net incomes but also alleviated poverty. Perlas pioneered a method, which is a variation of the bio-dynamic and ecological agriculture approach while incorporating the best in indigenous farming practices. His method is currently the basis for the country's two largest examples of sustainable agriculture. In Davao del sur, 800 areas of sustainable rice farming have seen the net income of farmers increase by 200 per cent without any use of pesticides. Perlas succeeded in focusing national attention and action on the hidden practice of using pesticides already banned or restricted in other countries. Twice he galvanized public and Government action resulting in the banning of eight highly hazardous pesticides. He also succeeded in convincing the Government to initiate policy reforms to reduce and phase out pesticides in farming. He pioneered the concept of seven dimensions of sustainability: economic viability, social justice and equity, cultural pluralism, holistic science, appropriate technology and human capacities and spirituality. These dimensions are now part of the national sustainable agriculture coalition.
Wednesday, 01 June 2011 20:13

Richard Evans Schultes

Richard Evans Schultes

Professor Richard Evans Schultes embarked on an active life of Amazonian exploration. So involved was he in the region that a huge part of that unique region was named after him a few years ago. He has written a number of publications, including Economic Botany of the Kiowa Indians; Plants and Human Affairs; The Botany and Chemistry of Hallucinogens; El Reino de los Dioses and The Healing Forest. He has been a contributing author to the Encyclopedia of Biological Sciences, Encylopedia Britannica and the Encyclopedia of Biochemistry. Professor Schultes is the recipient of a number of award including Colombia's Order of Victoria Regia (1969); the Cross of Boyaca (1983) and the WWF Gold Medal (1984).


Wednesday, 01 June 2011 20:10

Josef Tamir

Josef Tamir

Mr. Tamir has been a journalist, a politician, a diplomat and more recentl head of Israel's umbrella NGO "Life and Environment" which brings together all the non-governmental environmental groups in Israel.

As a senior statesman of the environmental movement, Mr. Tamir's contributions and role in Israeli environmentalism is important both historically and in the context of the present efforts being made in the environmental movement. He is the author of The Environment - One Universe.

He has received a number of awards, including: First Prize from the Ministry of the Interior, for significant achievements in the quality of the environment (1977); the Council of Beautiful Israel Award to "Israel's Quality of Life and Environment Pioneer and Champion" (1979); Quality of Life Award of the Knesset Speaker (for elevating environmental issues to the forefront of the Knesset agenda as well as of local authorities and public institutions) (1983).

He organized the opposition, which prevented the building of hotels on the sea front, which would obstruct sea-breezes in the direction of Tel Aviv's interior.

Wednesday, 01 June 2011 20:08

The Chosun Ilbo

The Chosun Ilbo

The Chosun Ilbo is the oldest, and most widely circulated newspaper in Korea. Through a series of articles this publication shed light on waste pollution and methods for its reduction and instilled in the public that they too can make viable contributions, through practical adjustments in their everyday lives.

The Chosun Ilbo produced and distributed paper bags for recycling newspapers in 28 cities. By the end of 1992, 11 million paper bags had been distributed and were effectively used, with 2.2 million copies of newspaper not going to waste everyday. A recycling headquarters was established by July 1992.

The Chosun Ilbo produced two guidebooks on waste: Waste not to be thrown away and Let's Learn About Waste, aimed at educating the public. They also developed the "Let's Pitch in the Waste Reducing Campaign" which drew the participation of the Republic's President.

They organized and sponsored the International Symposium on Solid Waste Recycling Technology and hosted environmental cultural events including an environmental music concert in October 1992, using the slogan Don't Waste Wastes.

A number of popular musical groups and personalities performed with the aim of spreading environmental awareness. They launched and hosted a 14 km bicycle riding campaign in cooperation with the Korean Olympic Cycling Committee at the Olympic Stadium in which 1,500 people participated.

The Chosun Ilbo received the Medal of Merit from the Korean Government and the International Olympic Committee Environment Trophy.

Wednesday, 01 June 2011 20:05

Brenda and Robert Vale

Brenda and Robert Vale

Brenda and Robert Vale, both architects and lecturers, have shown an outstanding commitment to a sustainable lifestyle. They are at the leading edge of developing houses and buildings, which have minimal impact on the environment.

They have developed and moved into the "Autonomous House", which collects and purifies rainwater for drinking and washing; uses a composting toilet for waste treatments; needs no central heating because of the very high insulation standards; and generates its annual demand for electricity by using solar energy. This house is practical evidence of the Vales' commitment and in 1992, they were awarded the first "Green Building of the Year Award".

Wednesday, 01 June 2011 00:00

Bernadette Vallely

 

Ms. Bernadette Vallely

 

Ms. Bernadette Vallely, founder and former Director of the Women's Environmental Network (WEN) has been instrumental in linking environmental problems with practical women's action in the fields of consumer information and health. She set up the organization with her own money and worked without a salary for three years. WEN has over 200 affiliated organizations, representing a network of over five million women, local activist groups and over 3,000 individual supporters. Past campaigns have included chlorine-free paper, chocolate and pesticides, minimum packaging, eco-labelling, dioxins and chlorine, tampon safety and boreal and temperate forest protection. WEN's first campaign successfully persuaded companies to stop using chlorine bleached paper in a number of consumer products including sanitary protection, disposable nappies, office paper, coffee filters, magazines and art papers. Awards received by Bernadette Vallely include the British Environment Media Award: Campaign of the Year (1993); Ethical Consumer Award for Best Consumer Campaign (1993); Cosmopolitan Award for Young Women Achievers (1991); UNIFEM/Women and Environment, Partners in Life Success Story (1991) and the Prima Green Award for best environmental organization (1990). She has also written and contributed to many books on the environment available in many languages including 1001 Ways to Save the Planet and the Young Persons Guide to Saving the Planet.

Bernadette also was responsible for creating and managing the award-winning Save the World Club (2000-2011), a children’s eco-arts charity whose main projects created urban art to combat graffiti involving more than 15,000 members of the public and covering hundreds of metres of ugly walls and underpasses in London. The club won the prestigious Queens Award for Voluntary Service amongst its many awards for its exciting approach to urban environmentalism and the engagement of young people in their local community.

Bernadette Vallely is currently managing a national choir Shakti Sings dedicated to “honouring the earth through song “ and promotes women’s sacred activities to protect the earth. This includes managing a team Gaia’s Guardians, whose main interest is adopting and protecting rivers and raising consciousness about the sacred nature of rivers and the earth. She is a radio broadcaster, writer and painter. Earth Goddesses of the World is to be published June 2013 and charts more than 60 Earth Goddesses of many faiths throughout history.

Page 3 of 4